Climate Change

Poor Swelter as Urban Areas of U.S. Southwest Get Hotter

As climate change accelerates, low-income districts in the Southwestern United States are 4 to 7 degrees hotter in Fahrenheit — on average — than wealthy neighborhoods in the same metro regions, University of California, Davis, researchers have found in a new analysis.

Becoming Arizona

We began this series nearly a year ago, after another very hot summer. We end it in a changed world. In some ways, the end brings us back to the beginning. By 2100, Sacramento is still expected to feel more like Phoenix or Tucson. That is still going to affect our lands, our health and our quality of life, especially for the most vulnerable among us. We still need solutions that both prevent future climate change and adapt to the changes already here.

California’s Climate Refugia: Mapping the Stable Places

Some landscapes can hold their own against climate change better than others. A study from the University of California, Davis, maps these places, called 'climate refugia,' where existing vegetation is most likely to buffer the impacts of climate change through the end of the century.